Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers

The Organising Committee is pleased to announce the following confirmed keynote speaker:

Dr. Shelly Craig

Dr. Shelly Craig

Canada Research Chair in Sexual and Gender Minority Youth

Dr. Craig is Canada Research Chair in Sexual and Gender Minority Youth and Professor at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto. Her program of research, based on twenty-five years of community and clinical practice, is focused on developing affirmative programs and interventions to enhance the wellbeing of gender and sexual minority youth, particularly using digital technologies.

Joe Wong

Joe Wong

Executive Director of APTN (Asia Pacific Transgender Network)

Joe is a trans masculine advocate born in Singapore. He is Executive Director of APTN (Asia Pacific Transgender Network), leading it in its community engagement work in sexual, general and mental health, and human rights.  He has contributed to many global, regional, and local initiatives. He was the driving force behind the Asia and the Pacific Trans Health Blueprint, a key document outlining challenges, gaps, and interventions for transgender people in the region. He was a co-author for a paper “Putting the “T” into the tools: A roadmap for implementation of new global and regional transgender guidance”, published in the Journal of the International AIDS Society, and contributed the crucial, but often ignored, transgender perspective for publications in The Lancet. He was closely involved in advocacy to remove the trans diagnoses from the mental disorders chapter of ICD.

Community Panel Keynote Speakers:

Aunty Lillian Lampton

Aunty Lillian Lampton

Mum Lil or Aunty Lil is an active member of the Palm Island Community. She was Born in Townsville, North Queensland and has strong connections to tribal areas on both sides of her Father and Mother’s sides. She first visited the Palm Island Aboriginal Community when she was 16 years of age. She later lived on the Yarrabah Aboriginal Community, outside of Cairns. Here she began the process of wanting a reassignment done, travelled to Sydney, and attended Tranby College in Glebe. Her sex reassignment was completed here on 8th June 1978 when she was 26 years old. Aunty Lil went back to the Palm Island Aboriginal Community, where she found my roots there, and continued to live there for the next 40 odd years. She is now 67 years old and still in good health.

Aunty Lil has a Diploma Frontline Management, Certificate IV in Business and as a Tutor (Trainer and Assessor). She has worked at a local retail store outlet on Palm Island, a teacher aide for the State School on Palms, and as the secretary/receptionist, then the administration officer and later the CEO for the Local Community Council. Currently Aunty Lil is a tutor at Palm Island TAFE Campus.

She has had the opportunity to work with youth in the Palm Island community, not only to help with employment pathways, but to encourage each young person to be able to be recognised their own individual rights, and to be competent to achieve what they would live to achieve. She has been a dedicated worker in her community and is considered the after-hours support person for issues related to safe sex and health and well-being for the young LGBTI community. The majority of the time, she is at home, on Palm Island, and monitoring their young LGBTI people, who know, that they can come to her anytime for support.

 

Lisa Taylor

Lisa Taylor

Lisa is a Worimi Sistergirl living in the Northern Rivers NSW, she has been an active member and advocate of the Sistergirl and Brotherboy community for over 20 years . Lisa attended the Sistergirl conference on Magnetic Island in 1999 and later sat on the board of the Anwernekenhe Nation Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Alliance as the national  Sistergirl and Brotherboy rep . In 2012 Lisa started the facebook support and advocacy group Sistergirls and Brotherboys Australia .

Lisa is also a member of Tekwabi Giz a national collaboration of people and organisations from Aboriginal, Torres Strait and South Sea Islander descent who are working with LGBTI people across Australia. In partnership with the National LGBTI Health Alliance.

Simone Miller

Simone Miller

Simone is a proud Kookatha sistergirl from Koonibba Aboriginal Community which is located 700km west of Adelaide.

 She has been working with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service for more then 8 yrs as a Social Worker, she has a passion for helping her Indigenous Community and her sistergirl community. She always wanted to be a Social Worker because of the lack of support she had growing up being sistergirl in an Aboriginal Community.

She has been involved in the Families like mine campaign that Beyond Blue created, NITV story on Sistergirls and CAAMA Radio interview about being sistergirl. She believes with more education and training in Community controlled organisations we can make a difference to better support this group of people that often miss out or are overlooked because the lack of understanding within community.

Aunty Venessa

Aunty Venessa

My name is Vanessa Culbong-Smith, I am a 68 year old Indigenous Sistergirl, and I was born in the south west of Western Australia, I started life as an underage 16 year old Drag Queen and I had visions of being a fabulous Drag Performer which never eventuated because I met a straight man who did not think that was what he wanted in a partner, even though it was how he met me, and we had a 24 year relationship which after 10 years collapsed in a heap of infidelity but it took me another 14 years to walk away from. But in the meantime I was still able to do the things that were relevant to me, I lived the most unique lifestyle that someone like myself could live and still remain alive, anyways, I had been on hormones ( Stilbestrole ) whilst still in Perth, but which I gave up in Sydney because I didn’t think that the life of a Drag Performer was on the cards for me. At 25 years of age I Looked in the mirror one day and said to myself that this is not going to last forever and decided to go back to school, because I had left school half way through year 9 and I wanted something to fall back to if all else failed. I enrolled in an Aboriginal College called Tranby in Glebe NSW, it was like a Finishing School if you like which’s purpose was to skill you up to survive as an Aboriginal Person, whilst I was at this college I became very much involved in the struggle of Aboriginal Australia and it’s politics, I am still very much tuned into our struggle today, and I think that it has prepared me for the struggle that we as Indigenous LGBTI People who are fighting for equity and equality today.